BLACK VEIL BRIDES' JINXX Blasts DONALD TRUMP For Refusing To Rename Military Bases Named After Confederate Generals

BLACK VEIL BRIDES' JINXX Blasts DONALD TRUMP For Refusing To Rename Military Bases Named After Confederate Generals

BLACK VEIL BRIDES guitarist Jeremy "Jinxx" Ferguson has slammed President Donald Trump for refusing to rename forts named after Confederate leaders and soldiers.

As Americans continue to grapple with systemic racism, there is a growing call to remove symbols honoring Confederate figures from military bases — including Fort Lee, Fort Hood, Fort Benning, Fort Gordon, Fort Bragg, Fort Polk, Fort Pickett, Fort A.P. Hill, Fort Rucker and Camp Beauregard — and the U.S. Capitol.

On Wednesday, Trump quashed the idea of renaming military bases honoring Confederate generals, saying they are "part of a Great American Heritage, and a history of Winning, Victory and Freedom."

"The United States of America trained and deployed our HEROES on these Hallowed Grounds, and won two World Wars," he wrote on Twitter. "Therefore, my Administration will not even consider the renaming of these Magnificent and Fabled Military Installations... ...Our history as the Greatest Nation in the World will not be tampered with. Respect our Military!!"

Earlier today (Sunday, June 14), Jinxx took to his Instagram to share a photo of a shredded U.S. flag, and he included the following message: "My ggggrandfather George Lucke and his brothers fought under this very flag during the American Civil War 1861-5. On June 22, 1864, when Confederate troops under General A.P. Hill tried to capture this same flag at Petersburg, Virginia, he and his comrades ripped this flag apart and stuffed the remnants in their coat pockets, refusing to let the enemy take possession of the colors (which explains why this is all that remains). George's brother Frederick was among many of the regiment to be captured and subsequently interred and tortured in the notorious Andersonville Confederate prison camp in Georgia.

"Prior to the war, George and his 2 younger brothers emigrated to America from Germany in 1853 in search of a better life. They were hired as day laborers on the Molyneux farm in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, soon after. Motivated by a novel called 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' by Harriet Beecher Stowe that was published the year before, the Molyneux family were incensed to fight for the cause of abolishing the evil institution of slavery. Their farm became a station on the infamous Underground Railroad, helping 'fugitive' runaway slaves escape their captors in the South to freedom in the non-slave states in the North and into Canada. It was no wonder these brothers would enlist in the Union Army for such cause when the war broke out in 1861. George would marry Jane Molyneux, the middle daughter of the family, shortly after the war. She was present during President Lincoln's 'Gettysburg Address' speech in 1863, on the field where her elder brother mortally fell (and where George lost his thumb defending the Union line during the Confederate 'Picket's Charge'). They were considered very PROGRESSIVE and radical in their beliefs for their day, fought for the end of slavery, human rights, and the preservation of a new country that was designed to protect such unalienable rights. In my opinion, they fought on the right side of history.

"Think about this in November when we have 'leaders' who refuse to rename such southern US Army bases like 'Fort A.P. Hill', named for a known Confederate general, a slave owner, and traitor to this flag. #flagday #blacklivematter #votethemout"











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My ggggrandfather George Lucke and his brothers fought under this very flag during the American Civil War 1861-5. On June 22, 1864, when Confederate troops under General A.P. Hill tried to capture this same flag at Petersburg, Virginia, he and his comrades ripped this flag apart and stuffed the remnants in their coat pockets, refusing to let the enemy take possession of the colors (which explains why this is all that remains). George’s brother Frederick was among many of the regiment to be captured and subsequently interred and tortured in the notorious Andersonville Confederate prison camp in Georgia. Prior to the war, George and his 2 younger brothers emigrated to America from Germany in 1853 in search of a better life. They were hired as day laborers on the Molyneux farm in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, soon after. Motivated by a novel called “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” by Harriet Beecher Stowe that was published the year before, the Molyneux family were incensed to fight for the cause of abolishing the evil institution of slavery. Their farm became a station on the infamous Underground Railroad, helping “fugitive” runaway slaves escape their captors in the South to freedom in the non-slave states in the North and into Canada. It was no wonder these brothers would enlist in the Union Army for such cause when the war broke out in 1861. George would marry Jane Molyneux, the middle daughter of the family, shortly after the war. She was present during President Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address” speech in 1863, on the field where her elder brother mortally fell (and where George lost his thumb defending the Union line during the Confederate “Picket’s Charge”). They were considered very PROGRESSIVE and radical in their beliefs for their day, fought for the end of slavery, human rights, and the preservation of a new country that was designed to protect such unalienable rights. In my opinion, they fought on the right side of history. Think about this in November when we have ‘leaders’ who refuse to rename such southern US Army bases like “Fort A.P. Hill”, named for a known Confederate general, a slave owner, and traitor to this flag. #flagday #blacklivematter #votethemout


A post shared by Jinxx (@jinxxed4life) on


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